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APTC training opens doors for further studies - Copy

APTC training opens doors for further studies

Nov 01, 2019

Australia Pacific Training Coalition (APTC) alumnus Samuela Toa Finau of Tonga has excelled in his training to exemplify “creating skills for life”.

Samuela, who works for Tonga Power Limited, and graduated from APTC in 2015, accredits his Certificate III in Engineering - Mechanical Trade (Diesel Fitting) (MEM30205) for contributing to his progression into a senior technician role – a step up from the junior mechanic position he held prior to studying.

Mechanical Engineering was not Samuela’s chosen field, as he had previously acquired a qualification in Marine Engineering and had worked as a marine engineer at the Ministry of Infrastructure in Tonga.

During his six months of training at APTC, Samuela was able to explore engineering as a specialty.

“The mechanical engineering workshop at APTC was where I gained knowledge on the operation of various processes involved in manufacturing and production through the use of advanced tools and good learning materials. The courses are hands-on,” Samuela shared.

After completing his course, he went on to receive further training opportunities abroad, including in countries like China, Japan and the United Arab Emirates.

Samuela attributes his educational success to his father, who is a marine engineer by profession, and acknowledged his APTC trainer, Mr Mitiani Seduadua.

According to Samuela, if someone wants to learn something new and have a career that contributes to a better future, APTC is the place to be.

“Even if I do not get any job, I can support myself through self-employment. The skills I gained from APTC have given me a future,” Samuela said.

In addition to gaining technical skills, Samuela also learned the value of sharing knowledge and ideas, adding he would share these with his colleagues in Tonga.

Samuela is currently in Fiji for further studies and has had the pleasure of catching up with many of his former classmates who are part of the 15,000-strong APTC Alumni network across the Pacific.

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